6 Signs of an Overwatered Monstera ( + Guide To Save It)

It’s easy to see why the Monstera deliciosa, with its glossy green leaves and striking aerial roots, is a popular houseplant. But what happens when a beautiful, healthy houseplant is given too much water? It becomes an overwatered monstera plant, of course!

This plant is wilting and its leaves are starting to turn yellow. If you’re not careful, it will eventually die. So, how do you prevent your plant from becoming an overwatered monstera? Keep reading to find out!

Can you overwater your monstera (Swiss Cheese) plant?

Overwatering is a common problem with houseplants, and monsteras are no exception. These striking plants are native to tropical rainforests, so they’re accustomed to high humidity and plenty of moisture.

However, that doesn’t mean that they can tolerate being constantly wet. If the soil around a monstera is constantly soggy, it can lead to root rot, which can eventually kill the plant.

To avoid overwatering, it’s important to let the top few inches of soil dry out between watering. In addition, be sure to use a pot with good drainage so that excess water can easily escape. 

6 Signs of an overwatered monstera:

Yellowing leaves

One of the most common problems with houseplants is over-watering. This can often lead to yellowing leaves, as was the case with my monstera plant.

When a plant is over-watered, excess water forces itself through tiny gaps between roots causing them to suffocate and eventually rot away!. As a result, the roots are unable to absorb sufficient water and essential nutrients, which leads to monstera leaves turning yellow and start to fall off.

Dark brown spots on leaves

If you see dark brown spots on monstera leaves, this is another sign of overwatering. These spots are caused by waterlogged roots that are no longer able to absorb oxygen.

These spots are also caused by a build-up of salts in the soil, which can damage plant roots and prevent them from taking up water and nutrients. As the roots suffocate, they start to die and decay, which leads to brown spots on the leaves.

In severe cases, the entire leaf may turn brown and drop off.

Mold growth on top of the soil

If you see mold growing on the surface of your monstera’s potting mix, this is a sure sign that the plant is being overwatered.

The mold is caused by excess moisture in the potting mix, which creates the perfect environment for mold to grow. Not only is mold unsightly, but it can also be harmful to your plant. If the mold is left unchecked, it can spread to the roots and cause root rot. 

Mushrooms growing around the base of the plant

If you see mushrooms growing around the base of your monstera, this is another sign that the plant is being overwatered.

Mushrooms are a type of fungi that thrive in moist environments. They can quickly spread through the potting mix and affect the roots of your plant. In severe cases, the mushrooms can kill the roots, causing the plant to die. 

A foul odor emanating from the soil

If you notice a foul odor coming from the potting mix, this is a sign that the plant is rotting.

When roots rot, they release a sulfuric smell that is similar to the smell of rotten eggs. If you notice this smell, it’s important to take action right away to save your plant. 

Soil takes more than 10 days to dry out

If the potting mix takes more than 10 days to dry out, this is a sign that the plant is being overwatered.

When the soil is constantly wet, it prevents the roots from getting the oxygen they need to stay healthy. As a result, the plant starts to suffocate and die due to insufficient nutrition. 

How to save an overwatered monstera:

Fix or correct soggy soil conditions

  • The first step to saving an overwatered plant is to correct the soil conditions. If the potting mix is too wet, it’s important to let it dry out completely before watering again.
  • Do a finger test to check the moisture level of the soil. If the potting mix is too wet, you will feel water seeping out from between your fingers. So, avoid watering you feel up to 2 inches of soil dry.
  • To speed up the drying process, you can add more drainage material to the potting mix. This will help to reduce the amount of water that the potting mix retains.
  • In addition, be sure to use a pot with good drainage holes to allow excess water to escape. 
  • Moving the plant to better lighting conditions also helps. Place the plant in a bright location, but be sure to avoid direct sunlight. The increased light will help to evaporate any excess moisture from the potting mix. 

Water less frequently

Once you’ve corrected the soil conditions, it’s important to water your plant less frequently. Watering once a week should be sufficient for most plants.

If you’re not sure how often to water, check the potting mix before watering. If the top inch of soil is dry, it’s time to water again.

It’s also important to make sure that you’re not over-watering when you do water. Be sure to only use enough water to wet the potting mix and not saturate it. 

Allow the plant to dry out completely between watering

To revive your overwatered monstera plant, it’s important to allow the plant to dry out completely between watering.

This will help to prevent the roots from getting waterlogged and rotting. If the potting mix is too dry, you can mist the leaves with water to help the plant stay hydrated.

Fertilize monthly

In addition to watering less frequently, it’s important to fertilize your plant monthly. This will help to replenish the nutrients that have been lost due to overwatering.

Use a balanced fertilizer that is high in nitrogen and low in phosphorus. This will help to encourage new growth and prevent the plant from dying.

Fixing root rot

If you witness that your monstera’s roots are rotting due to overwatering, you need to take action to save your plant quickly.

Here are a few steps that you can take:

  1. Remove the plant from the pot and inspect the roots. If they are mushy or have dark brown spots, they are probably rotting.
  2. Keep the roots under running water to wash away the soil and rotten roots.
  3. Cut away any dead or dying roots with sharp scissors. make sure to cut only the brown rotten roots and keep the healthy white roots.
  4. Use a fungicide and apply it to roots to prevent further damage.
  5. Put the plant in a new pot with a fresh, well-draining potting mix.
  6. Keep an eye on the plant and make sure the potting mix is not constantly wet. If it is, adjust your watering schedule accordingly.

How should you water monstera?

When it comes to watering monstera, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, monstera prefers to have their roots in moist soil. As a result, they should be watered regularly, and the soil should be allowed to dry out somewhat between waterings.

Second, monstera does not like to sit in water. Be sure to empty any drainage saucers after watering, and never let the plant stand in water for more than a few minutes.

Finally, monstera requires high humidity levels to thrive. If the air in your home is dry, you may need to mist the leaves of your plant on a regular basis.

How often should you water monstera?

Most monstera plants should be watered every 7-10 days. However, there are a few factors that can affect how often you need to water, such as the size of the plant, the type of potting mix, and the temperature and humidity levels in your home.

To know for sure if your plant needs water, always check the potting mix before watering. If the top inch of soil is dry, it’s time to water again.

You can check my how often to water monstera? post here!

Tips to avoid overwatering monstera in future

To avoid overwatering your monstera plant in future, there are a few things that you can do.

First, make sure to use a well-draining potting mix. This will help to prevent the roots from sitting in water and getting waterlogged.

Second, be sure to only water when the potting mix is dry. You can check the potting mix before watering to see if it’s time to water again.

Third, consider using a self-watering pot. This type of pot has a reservoir that stores water, and the plant only draws up as much water as it needs. This can help to prevent overwatering and keep the roots from getting waterlogged.

Fourth, If you live in a dry climate, consider investing in a humidifier. This will help to keep the air around your plant moist and prevent the leaves from drying out.

Finally, be sure to fertilize your plant monthly. This will help to replenish the nutrients that have been lost due to overwatering.

Use a balanced fertilizer that is high in nitrogen and low in phosphorus. This will help to encourage new growth and prevent the plant from dying.

Overwatered vs underwatered monstera

It can be difficult to tell if a monstera plant is overwatered or underwatered. However, there are a few things that you can look for to help you determine which one it is.

If the leaves of the plant are wilting, yellowing, or browning, this is a sign of overwatered monstera plants. The leaves may also be drooping or falling off.

If the plant is not getting enough water, the leaves will be dry and crispy. They may also turn brown and fall off.

The best way to tell if a plant is overwatered or underwatered is to check the potting mix. If it is soggy or wet, the plant is overwatered. If it is dry or crumbly, the plant is underwatered.

Once you have determined whether the plant is overwatered or underwatered, you can take steps to correct the problem.

To save an overwatered monstera plant, follow the steps in this article.

When to water after transplanting monstera?

Water your monstera immediately after transplanting it into a new pot. This will help to settle the roots and prevent them from drying out. After that, water when the top inch of soil is dry. Check the potting mix before watering to see if it’s time to water again.

It’s important to transplant monstera into a pot that is only slightly larger than the current one. This will help to prevent overwatering and keep the roots from getting waterlogged.

FAQs on overwatered monstera

What does overwatered monstera look like?

The leaves of an overwatered Monstera plant will be wilting, yellowing, or browning. The leaves may also be drooping or falling off. The potting mix will be soggy or wet.

Can a monstera recover from overwatering?

Yes, a monstera plant can recover from overwatering if the problem is caught early enough. Follow the steps in this article to save your plant.

Can monstera recover from root rot?

Yes, monstera plants can recover from root rot if the problem is caught early enough. Follow the steps mentioned above in this article to save your plant.

What is the best way to water a monstera plant?

The best way to water a Monstera plant is to check the potting mix before watering. If the top inch of soil is dry, it’s time to water again.

Is it better to overwater or underwater a monstera plant?

It’s better to underwater a Monstera plant than to overwater it. Overwatering can lead to root rot, which can kill the plant. Underwatering will cause the leaves to dry out and turn brown, but the plant will not die.

How can I tell if my overwatered monstera is still alive?

To check if your overwatered Monstera plant is still alive, look for new growth. New leaves, stems, or flowers are a good sign that the plant is still alive. You can also check the potting mix to see if it’s dry or soggy. If the potting mix is dry, the plant is alive and well. If the potting mix is soggy, the plant is still alive but may be in danger of dying.

Can you bottom water monstera?

Yes, you can bottom water monstera plants. To bottom water, place the plant in a sink or tub and let the water run until it is coming out of the drainage holes. Allow the plant to sit in the water for 30 minutes to an hour.

This will help to saturate the roots and prevent them from drying out. After bottom watering, be sure to empty the sink or tub and allow the plant to drain completely. Do not place the plant back in its pot until it is completely dry.

Conclusion: Overwatered Monstera

If you notice any of the common symptoms of overwatering, take action right away to prevent your plant from succumbing to root rot. You can save your Monstera by following these simple steps:

1. Use a well-draining potting mix.

2. Only water when the potting mix is dry.

3. Use a self-watering pot.

4. If you live in a dry climate, invest in a humidifier.

5. Fertilize your plant monthly with a balanced fertilizer.

By following these steps, you can save your overwatered Monstera plant and help it to recover.

Overwatered Monstera plant